WhatTheyThink Special Report Provides Detailed Demographic Data For The Graphic Design Industry, With Forecasts To 2013

WhatTheyThink Special Report Provides Detailed Demographic Data For The Graphic Design Industry, With Forecasts To 2013

February 3rd, 2009 – Lexington, KY – WhatTheyThink, the leading news and information site for the graphic communications industry, announces the immediate availability of The U.S. Graphic Design Business 2008–2013: Industry Demographics, Trends and Forecasts, an update to the landmark study of the design industry first published in 2004. This 74-page report offers an extensive examination of the changing nature of graphic design, and investigates the opportunities and challenges for the industry and those businesses that serve and supply it.

Purchase The U.S. Graphic Design Business 2008–2013: Industry Demographics, Trends and Forecasts

While a discussion of the impact of the current economic recession on designers is included, the report also concentrates on the longer-term trends that are transforming graphic communications. Specifically, an acceleration of shifts to electronic media, the growing prevalence of desktop design tools and the changing nature of competition in the design industry, and the changing demographics of publishers, agencies, and other employers of designers are all having dramatic effects on the market for design and the demographics of the industry as a whole.

The report draws on U.S. Census Bureau data, as well as proprietary modeling and forecasting techniques, to gauge, on a year-to-year basis, the number of graphic design establishments, the number of full-time employees in the industry, graphic design revenues, and graphic design firms’ capital expenditures—with data going back to 1997 and projected to 2013. Graphic design freelancers, a not insubstantial part of the industry, are also covered in depth.

Critical study findings include:

  • a projected 11% increase in graphic design establishments between 2008 and 2013, with a 13% increase in the number of design employees in that same period;
  • projected 2% growth in the graphic design revenues between 2008 and 2013, the result, in part, of more players sharing a slow-growing pie; and
  • projected 20% growth in the number of graphic design freelancers.

The U.S. Graphic Design Business 2008–2013: Industry Demographics, Trends, and Forecastsis available for online purchase at the WhatTheyThink eStore in PDF format (http://members.whattheythink.com).

Researcher’s Comments

“If you look back at historical industry demographic data (as we have), graphic design companies have been largely immune to past economic downturns and even recessions, thanks in no small part to the growth and maturity of desktop publishing tools and the demand for what those tools produce. Similar forces are at work today, only in the case of ‘desktop publishing’ read ‘electronic media.’ The past couple years, especially 2008, have marked a crucial turning point for the industry, and what is happening now will affect designers—and graphic communications companies of all types—until 2013 and well beyond.” —Richard Romano, Senior Analyst, WhatTheyThink

Availability

The WhatTheyThink special report, The U.S. Graphic Design Business 2008–2013: Industry Demographics, Trends, and Forecasts is available for purchase by visiting the secure WhatTheyThink eStore online at http://members.whattheythink.com. The price for the 74-page report is $2,875. WhatTheyThink eStore customers can download this report in PDF Acrobat format immediately after purchase.

Editor’s Note

Additional information pertaining to each report is available for editorial purposes. Please make inquiries directly to Cary Sherburne (603-430-5463 or cary@whattheythink.com).

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